how might we properly transform an unused industrial building for new functions?

issue

As the world ages collectively, more and more buildings find themselves in need of renovation and rejuvenation in order to stay on track with the idea of ‘progressive’ cities. But most of our societies see ‘progress’ by tearing down an old building in order to make room for the new. Rather than creating a narrow vision that imagines possibilities with a blank slate, what if we can make the best of existing old buildings to stay fit with the socio-economic currents?

name
UISI Masterplan
location
Gresik
area
175000 sqm
client
Universitas Internasional Semen Indonesia
status
Built

figure 1

Site location.

how might we properly transform an unused industrial building for new functions?

project name

UISI Masterplan

location

Gresik

area

175000 sqm

client

Universitas Internasional Semen Indonesia

status

Built

issue

As the world ages collectively, more and more buildings find themselves in need of renovation and rejuvenation in order to stay on track with the idea of ‘progressive’ cities. But most of our societies see ‘progress’ by tearing down an old building in order to make room for the new. Rather than creating a narrow vision that imagines possibilities with a blank slate, what if we can make the best of existing old buildings to stay fit with the socio-economic currents?

context & background

Located in an area owned by PT. Semen Indonesia (Persero) Tbk, a formerly cement factory complex is intended to be transformed into a campus facility in the future (fig. 1).

idea

The principle of utilizing an existing former factory building is to examine the feasibility of the physical condition of the building from a structural aspect due to the dominance of fairly solid concrete (fig. 2), and to include a new volume in it which will later be filled with certain activities. The development of new spaces in the building will use materials that are relatively easy to adapt to existing buildings, namely steel and glass (fig. 3).

Another principle that is applied in the phase one area is the use of the flat roof of the building as a garden and outdoor space (fig. 4). In addition to increasing the percentage of campus Green Open Space, it is also useful for student activities.

The construction process is divided into two phases. Phase One (fig. 5) is focused on the primary buildings, i.e. the classroom building, library, office building, and canteen. While the Phase Two (fig. 6) focuses on adding the campus public facilities and expanding the learning area.

design method

#Physical Building Type Identification

1. Classroom Building

The two former Silo buildings in the Phase One area (fig. 7), in principle, consist of 6 towers which will function as classrooms (fig. 8). One of the towers will be used as a vertical circulation in the form of an elevator (fig. 9), while the other tower will be used for service rooms (toilets, fire stairs, etc.) (fig. 10 ) and the remainder will be used as a lecture hall divided into several floors (fig. 11). One of the Silos will have access to the library and office buildings via a pedestrian bridge (skywalk bridge) (fig. 12).

2. Library

For the building that will be used as a library (fig. 13) the proposed design is to create a perimeter around the inside that will function as a public space, easily and freely accessible to visitors (fig. 14). Whereas in the inner area there will be a library room with walls that are dominated by glass, so that the lighting is adequate but is not exposed to direct rays from the sun's heat (fig. 15).

3. Office

In the former warehouse building (fig. 16), it is planned to be an office building where the basic element that is maintained is the steel frame structure (fig. 17). Inside, there will be building floors that are open-plan so that it is easy to adjust to the needs of office activities. The roof and walls are proposed in the form of a continuous skin with metal (fig. 18), so that it is reminiscent of the coating walls of the existing building but in a more contemporary form.

#Macro-scale Relationship Between the Buildings

1. Public Facilities

In order for the campus facilities to perform well as a whole complex, additional public facilities aside from the main programs must be considered as well (fig. 19). In this case, for the masterplan project the additional public facilities include the design of a mosque (fig. 20), sports facilities (fig. 21), parking lots (fig. 22), communal spaces (fig. 23), and a multipurpose building (fig. 24).

2. Circulation

The principle of the circulation path design is to provide a clear area between motorized vehicle lanes (planned to use a ring road area of land), pedestrian paths (planned to connect between facilities), and bicycle lanes.

The concept of circulation in the UISI campus area is to minimize the accessibility of motorized vehicles in the area in the zoning / building cluster. This departs from the utilization of the existing vehicle lane in the factory area. In the former factory area that functioned as UISI land, there is a circulation route which is made of concrete and has a position on the outer perimeter of the factory building area. This route will be used as a motorized vehicle circulation route on the UISI campus adding parking pockets at multiple points catering to every parking need zone / cluster (fig. 25).

This motorized vehicle lane will have connections with pedestrians (fig. 26) and bicycle lanes (fig. 27), which will be able to reach up to the area near the building. Pedestrian and bicycle paths will later also be a link between the points of outer space between the buildings. In the future, UISI campus development will allow the availability of a powered shuttle car electricity to serve movements that have a long enough distance between zones / clusters.

3. Landscape

The main vegetation proposed in this Phase Two area is a functional tree forming the direction of space and also trees that are shade (fig. 28). Apart from that an attempt to form a comfortable microclimate for the study area, providing grass and plants (fig. 29) in buildings are things that are also proposed to be applied to the UISI campus buildings.

4. Drainage

Basically the UISI campus drainage system will be made by utilizing several channels that has been available before, and connect it with primary channels which will drain the water discharge from the building area to the secondary channel. Drainage channels can be provided in the form of open channels (on the outer perimeter of each zone) (fig. 30) as well as closed channels (fig. 31), if they are in the outer space area in the middle of the zone / cluster.

5. Utilities

The utilities for the Phase Two consist of electricity and clean water. For electricity purposes, the proposed idea is to provide a Power House / Genset Area at 7 points (fig. 32) to serve electricity needs in seven areas that are divided within the scope of the UISI area. For water needs, it will be proposed to provide a reservoir / reservoir to collect clean water first beforehand distributed for the needs of buildings.

result

When designing for the future, we must begin with our existing cities. The building sector accounts for roughly a third of global fuel consumption, and in turn, adaptive reuse projects are on the rise as our understanding of embodied energy grows. The entire adaptive reuse process, from start to finish, protects the environment while also reducing unnecessary waste.

Aside from the ecological & economical considerations, this project shows us that old buildings with great physical conditions always have the potential to be revived with a new breath of life within it (fig. 33).

how might we properly transform an unused industrial building for new functions?

project name

UISI Masterplan

location

Gresik

area

175000 sqm

client

Universitas Internasional Semen Indonesia

status

Built

issue

As the world ages collectively, more and more buildings find themselves in need of renovation and rejuvenation in order to stay on track with the idea of ‘progressive’ cities. But most of our societies see ‘progress’ by tearing down an old building in order to make room for the new. Rather than creating a narrow vision that imagines possibilities with a blank slate, what if we can make the best of existing old buildings to stay fit with the socio-economic currents?

context & background

Located in an area owned by PT. Semen Indonesia (Persero) Tbk, a formerly cement factory complex is intended to be transformed into a campus facility in the future (fig. 1).

idea

The principle of utilizing an existing former factory building is to examine the feasibility of the physical condition of the building from a structural aspect due to the dominance of fairly solid concrete (fig. 2), and to include a new volume in it which will later be filled with certain activities. The development of new spaces in the building will use materials that are relatively easy to adapt to existing buildings, namely steel and glass (fig. 3).

Another principle that is applied in the phase one area is the use of the flat roof of the building as a garden and outdoor space (fig. 4). In addition to increasing the percentage of campus Green Open Space, it is also useful for student activities.

The construction process is divided into two phases. Phase One (fig. 5) is focused on the primary buildings, i.e. the classroom building, library, office building, and canteen. While the Phase Two (fig. 6) focuses on adding the campus public facilities and expanding the learning area.

design method

#Physical Building Type Identification

1. Classroom Building

The two former Silo buildings in the Phase One area (fig. 7), in principle, consist of 6 towers which will function as classrooms (fig. 8). One of the towers will be used as a vertical circulation in the form of an elevator (fig. 9), while the other tower will be used for service rooms (toilets, fire stairs, etc.) (fig. 10 ) and the remainder will be used as a lecture hall divided into several floors (fig. 11). One of the Silos will have access to the library and office buildings via a pedestrian bridge (skywalk bridge) (fig. 12).

2. Library

For the building that will be used as a library (fig. 13) the proposed design is to create a perimeter around the inside that will function as a public space, easily and freely accessible to visitors (fig. 14). Whereas in the inner area there will be a library room with walls that are dominated by glass, so that the lighting is adequate but is not exposed to direct rays from the sun's heat (fig. 15).

3. Office

In the former warehouse building (fig. 16), it is planned to be an office building where the basic element that is maintained is the steel frame structure (fig. 17). Inside, there will be building floors that are open-plan so that it is easy to adjust to the needs of office activities. The roof and walls are proposed in the form of a continuous skin with metal (fig. 18), so that it is reminiscent of the coating walls of the existing building but in a more contemporary form.

#Macro-scale Relationship Between the Buildings

1. Public Facilities

In order for the campus facilities to perform well as a whole complex, additional public facilities aside from the main programs must be considered as well (fig. 19). In this case, for the masterplan project the additional public facilities include the design of a mosque (fig. 20), sports facilities (fig. 21), parking lots (fig. 22), communal spaces (fig. 23), and a multipurpose building (fig. 24).

2. Circulation

The principle of the circulation path design is to provide a clear area between motorized vehicle lanes (planned to use a ring road area of land), pedestrian paths (planned to connect between facilities), and bicycle lanes.

The concept of circulation in the UISI campus area is to minimize the accessibility of motorized vehicles in the area in the zoning / building cluster. This departs from the utilization of the existing vehicle lane in the factory area. In the former factory area that functioned as UISI land, there is a circulation route which is made of concrete and has a position on the outer perimeter of the factory building area. This route will be used as a motorized vehicle circulation route on the UISI campus adding parking pockets at multiple points catering to every parking need zone / cluster (fig. 25).

This motorized vehicle lane will have connections with pedestrians (fig. 26) and bicycle lanes (fig. 27), which will be able to reach up to the area near the building. Pedestrian and bicycle paths will later also be a link between the points of outer space between the buildings. In the future, UISI campus development will allow the availability of a powered shuttle car electricity to serve movements that have a long enough distance between zones / clusters.

3. Landscape

The main vegetation proposed in this Phase Two area is a functional tree forming the direction of space and also trees that are shade (fig. 28). Apart from that an attempt to form a comfortable microclimate for the study area, providing grass and plants (fig. 29) in buildings are things that are also proposed to be applied to the UISI campus buildings.

4. Drainage

Basically the UISI campus drainage system will be made by utilizing several channels that has been available before, and connect it with primary channels which will drain the water discharge from the building area to the secondary channel. Drainage channels can be provided in the form of open channels (on the outer perimeter of each zone) (fig. 30) as well as closed channels (fig. 31), if they are in the outer space area in the middle of the zone / cluster.

5. Utilities

The utilities for the Phase Two consist of electricity and clean water. For electricity purposes, the proposed idea is to provide a Power House / Genset Area at 7 points (fig. 32) to serve electricity needs in seven areas that are divided within the scope of the UISI area. For water needs, it will be proposed to provide a reservoir / reservoir to collect clean water first beforehand distributed for the needs of buildings.

result

When designing for the future, we must begin with our existing cities. The building sector accounts for roughly a third of global fuel consumption, and in turn, adaptive reuse projects are on the rise as our understanding of embodied energy grows. The entire adaptive reuse process, from start to finish, protects the environment while also reducing unnecessary waste.

Aside from the ecological & economical considerations, this project shows us that old buildings with great physical conditions always have the potential to be revived with a new breath of life within it (fig. 33).